New & Noteworthy



Archive for November, 2011

30 Nov 2011

Birding Club Enjoys Viewing Ornithological Specimens

As described in a recent article in The New York Times, some birding enthusiasts aren’t just interested in seeing live birds.  The Nuttall Ornithological Club, the nation’s oldest birding group, enjoys infrequent visits to the Harvard Museum of Comparative Zoology to view feathered specimens.  Learn more at http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/29/science/nations-oldest-birding-group-serves-as-a-collective-memory.html?_r=2&ref=science.

22 Nov 2011

Funding Opportunity for Collections Preservation from IMLS

The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) has announced the availability of funding for museums to improve management of their collections.  Connecting to Collections Statewide Implementation Grants are available to provide safe conditions for collections; to develop an emergency plan; to assign responsibility for collections care; and to work collaboratively to increase public and private support for, and raise public awareness about, collections care.

Up to $250,000 is available for each grantee.

IMLS will be hosting a webinar about the program on 15 December 2011 at 2:00 – 3:00 pm (ET) and 5 January 2012 at 2:00 – 3:00 pm (ET).

The deadline to apply is 1 February 2012.  More information is available at http://www.imls.gov/applicants/detail.aspx?GrantId=5.

03 Nov 2011

New Fish Species Discovered in Overlooked Coral Reefs

As much as coral reefs have captured the interest of scientists and the public, little is known about reefs that occur more than 200 feet below the surface.  These mesophotic, or “middle light,” reefs are the interest of Carole Baldwin, curator of fishes at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History.

Baldwin has been studying such reefs in the Caribbean Sea and searching for new fish species.  While marine life in the Caribbean has been well surveyed, mesophotic reefs have not.  Much of this knowledge gap is a result of the difficulty of visiting such ocean depths, which are generally too deep for scuba diving.  Discovering multiple new species in the Caribbean was “a huge surprise,” Baldwin said.  “Everyone thought, ‘Been there, done that.’ ”

Baldwin’s efforts were chronicled in an article published by the Washington Post on 31 October 2011.  Read the article at http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/deep-reef-twilight-zones-slowly-yield-their-secrets-to-explorers/2011/09/22/gIQATnuwZM_story.html.